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  • Release Date 2018-09-07
  • Label Intec
  • Catalog ID159
Carl Cox is an industry figurehead whos legacy in music includes his iconic label Intec, which he runs with friend and business partner Jon Rundell, and the new release is from Matt Sassari. Matt Sassari originally joined Intec working in collaboration with D-Unity but this is the Frenchmans second solo release following his EP on the label at the end of 2017. The success of his first solo release on Intec made a second almost inevitable and since then Matt Sassari has also contributed music to Dense & Pika's Kneaded Pains, Martin Eyerers Kling Klong, Sasha Carassis Phobiq and Monika Kruses Terminal M. On top of this he has also done a top selling remix of Green Velvets classic anthem "La La Land". A multitalented artist, Matt can effortlessly switch between making both techno and house music, but this release showcases his hard side with a thumping style that leans towards the more banging end of techno. Teaming up with German producer Patrik Berg fresh from their successful release together on Terminal M which received heavy DJ support and hit the top 3 on Beatport they are now back together for this next chapter on Intec. Nervosity starts the EP and from the offset takes no prisoners with the relentless pounding of its hammering kick drum. Building in intensity, the tracks ferocity is made more intense with grinding synths and the commanding vocals menacing tones. With a rigid sound that undoubtedly falls under the category of hard techno, this exhilarating track is strong enough to shake the foundation of any club in which its played. Second is Kun Daha which takes its title from the vocal phrases that have a tribal feel to them. Like a spiritual ceremony or perhaps a dark offering, the track has dramatic conga hits and booming tom drums reminiscent of those used by aboriginal tribes. Contrasting with the otherwise mechanical background, this distinctly individual cut has a tough sound and an unusual blend of textures. Not as hard as the first cut but still tailored to the club, this is peak time techno at its most captivating.